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Today in Labor History

Jan. 22, 1849
Terence V. Powderly was born in Carbondale, Pennsylvania. Powderly would become the Grand Master Workman of the Knights of Labor a labor organization that promoted an eight-hour workday, the end of child and convict labor, a graduated income tax, equal pay for equal work, and worker cooperatives. At its height in 1886, the Knights had over 700,000 members.
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Updated: Jan. 22 (14:05)

Organizing Victory at Quickway
Teamsters Local 89
House Revives Agenda After Impeachment Storm
Teamsters local 570
Young Workers Key to a Resurgent Labor Movement
Teamsters local 570
House Revives Agenda After Impeachment Storm
Teamsters Local 355
House Revives Agenda After Impeachment Storm
Teamsters Local 992
Young Workers Key to a Resurgent Labor Movement
Teamsters Local 992
 
     

Local and National Union News

Update: Contracts in Place at Toyota, Chef’s Warehouse; negotiations continue at AMR, others
Jan. 22, 2020 A three-year contract approved by members at Toyota provides annual wage increases, maintenance of Health & Welfare, employer contribution increase to the 401k, a signing bonus and improvements to language provisions. Members at Chef’s Warehouse approved a contract that included a significant... Local News

Attention drivers with CDLs: FMCSA doubles random drug testing rate to 50%
Jan. 9, 2020 The U.S. Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration has raised the random drug testing rate for controlled substances for commercial drivers to 50% from the current 25% of driver positions. The change went into effect Jan. 1… Truck News

Local 992 UPS driver created wildly popular ‘UPS Dogs’ social media pages
Jan. 7, 2020 When Sean McCarren, 44, started having little four-legged “fans” follow him around on his UPS route, he decided to start taking their photos. After collecting more than 60 pictures of dogs on his phone, he posted one on his personal Facebook page in 2013 just for fun. “Everybody got all excited about it, so I just went ahead and made a little Facebook page to share them all,” said McCarren, who lives in Martinsburg, W.Va., and works out of the Hagerstown UPS center. After he established the Facebook, Instagram and Twitter pages, other UPS drivers started posting dogs that they see on their travels delivering packages. There were steady posts for several years, then in 2017, the pages took off. “It just went viral,” McCarren said… Herald Media [McCarren has been a member of Teamsters Local 992 in Hagerstown, MD since 2002.]

Older news stories can be found at Local News

Elsewhere in the News
House Revives Agenda After Impeachment Storm
Jan. 22, 2020 | LEGISLATION | House Democrats are preparing to turn the focus back to their policy agenda now that impeachment has moved over to the Senate… Democratic leaders are aiming for a vote before President’s Day on Feb. 17 on major legislation to strengthen union bargaining and to enact tougher penalties on employers that retaliate against workers seeking to unionize. The bill, called the Protecting the Right to Organize (PRO) Act, would prohibit employers from making workers attend meetings meant to dissuade them… The Hill
Young Workers Key to a Resurgent Labor Movement
Jan. 21, 2020 | ACTIVISM | A decade that started with the worst recession in 75 years ended with a booming economy and record low unemployment rate. The “too big to fail” era also ushered in a new generation of workers far more progressive and activist than in the past. That’s a great thing for the labor movement. Certainly, young workers are concerned with the same issues that were the focus of those who came before them — fair wages for fair work, access to quality health care, and a stable pension that will enable a dignified retirement. But we are also more expansive in our approach fighting for workplace protections against harassment and discrimination, demanding LGBTQ+ rights, advocating for clean building practices and green investments that protect our environment and address climate change; and ensuring a healthy work-life balance for all employees… CommonWealth
Dr. King Understood the Power of Unions
Jan. 20, 2020 | ACTIVISM | In what would have been his 91st birthday, we celebrate the towering legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.—his moral force as a faith leader, his devotion to nonviolent resistance and, of course, the sacrifices he made to end legalized segregation in the South. But there is an often-overlooked aspect of his work: Dr. King was one of his era’s most fearsome champions of working people coming together to organize, build power and improve their lives. Here is how he put it in a speech to the Illinois AFL-CIO convention in October 1965: “The labor movement was the principal force that transformed misery and despair into hope and progress. Out of its bold struggles, economic and social reform gave birth to unemployment insurance, old age pensions, government relief for the destitute, and, above all, new wage levels that meant not mere survival but a tolerable life…” The Root
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It’s Time for Lawmakers to Acknowledge Workers Are Struggling
Jan. 17, 2020 | FAIR WAGES | There rightfully has been a lot of focus recently on the need for good-paying jobs. We wrote about it last week in this space and will again right now. Why? Because it is important to counter the narrative being pushed by some that everything is going just great for workers. Interest in the topic certainly goes beyond the Teamster Nation Blog. In fact, a report released last week by the Brookings Institute painted a bleak picture of the state of working America, noting that 44 percent of workers – 53 million workers overall – earn barely enough to live on. Their median earnings come out to about $18,000 a year. Many of these low-wage workers are in what should be their prime earning years of 25 to 54 (64 percent) and are the primary earners or contribute substantially to their family living expenses (51 percent). About 37 percent have children, and 23 percent live below the poverty line. This is all happening, mind you, while $10 billion in cuts are made to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, widely known as food stamps)... Teamsters  Related: 14 states (including Maryland and Virginia), D.C. and New York City sue to stop Trump plan to slash food stamps for 700,000 unemployed people
 
 
Teamsters local 570
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